Número de ficha: 152112

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ISBN
9780804796118
Clasificación DEWEY
305.80097243 VEL-u
Autor
Velasco Murillo, Dana , autor
Título
Urban indians in a silver city : Zacatecas, Mexico, 1546-1810 / Dana Velasco Murillo
Lugar de publicación
Stanford, California : Stanford University Press, 2016
Descripción
xv, 308 páginas : ilustraciones ; 24 cm.
Tipo de medio digital o análogo
sin medio rdamedia
Medio de almacenamiento
volumen rdacarrier
Bibliografía
Incluye referencias bibliográficas (páginas 275-297) e índice.
Nota de Resumen
n the sixteenth century, silver mined by native peoples became New Spain's most important export. Silver production served as a catalyst for northern expansion, creating mining towns that led to the development of new industries, markets, population clusters, and frontier institutions. Within these towns, the need for labor, raw materials, resources, and foodstuffs brought together an array of different ethnic and social groups--Spaniards, Indians, Africans, and ethnically mixed individuals or castas. On the northern edge of the empire, 350 miles from Mexico City, sprung up Zacatecas, a silver-mining town that would grow in prominence to become the "Second City of New Spain. "Urban Indians in a Silver City illuminates the social footprint of colonial Mexico's silver mining district. It reveals the men, women, children, and families that shaped indigenous society and shifts the view of indigenous peoples from mere laborers to settlers and vecinos (municipal residents). Dana Velasco Murillo shows how native peoples exploited the urban milieu to create multiple statuses and identities that allowed them to live in Zacatecas as both Indians and vecinos. In reconsidering traditional paradigms about ethnicity and identity among the urban Indian population, she raises larger questions about the nature and rate of cultural change in the Mexican north.
Fuente de adquisición
Saroos ; compra ; 27-01-2021
Materia
Indios de México -- Residencia Urbana -- Mexico -- Zacatecas -- Historia
Indios de México -- Zacatecas -- Identidad Étnica -- Historia
Plata -- Industrias -- Aspectos Sociales -- Zacatecas -- Historia
Materia Nombre Geográfico
Zacatecas -- Relaciones Étnicas -- Historia
México -- Historia -- Colonia, 1540-1810
etiq. info
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006 a
008 210208s2016 caua rb 001 0 eng c
020 |a9780804796118
035 |a152112
040 |aDLC |bspa|erda|cUNAMX|dCOLMICH
043 |an-mx---
082 00|a305.80097243|bVEL-u
100 1 |aVelasco Murillo, Dana|eautor
245 10|aUrban indians in a silver city |bZacatecas, Mexico, 1546-1810|cDana Velasco Murillo
264 1|aStanford, California :|bStanford University Press,|c2016
300 |axv, 308 páginas |bilustraciones|c24 cm.
336 |atext|2rdacontent
337 |asin medio|2rdamedia
338 |avolumen|2rdacarrier
504 |aIncluye referencias bibliográficas (páginas 275-297) e índice.
520 |an the sixteenth century, silver mined by native peoples became New Spain's most important export. Silver production served as a catalyst for northern expansion, creating mining towns that led to the development of new industries, markets, population clusters, and frontier institutions. Within these towns, the need for labor, raw materials, resources, and foodstuffs brought together an array of different ethnic and social groups--Spaniards, Indians, Africans, and ethnically mixed individuals or castas. On the northern edge of the empire, 350 miles from Mexico City, sprung up Zacatecas, a silver-mining town that would grow in prominence to become the "Second City of New Spain. "Urban Indians in a Silver City illuminates the social footprint of colonial Mexico's silver mining district. It reveals the men, women, children, and families that shaped indigenous society and shifts the view of indigenous peoples from mere laborers to settlers and vecinos (municipal residents). Dana Velasco Murillo shows how native peoples exploited the urban milieu to create multiple statuses and identities that allowed them to live in Zacatecas as both Indians and vecinos. In reconsidering traditional paradigms about ethnicity and identity among the urban Indian population, she raises larger questions about the nature and rate of cultural change in the Mexican north.
541 |aSaroos|ccompra|d27-01-2021
598 |aCEH
598 |aFEBRERO2021
650 0|aIndios de México |xResidencia Urbana|zMexico|zZacatecas |xHistoria
650 0|aIndios de México|zZacatecas |xIdentidad Étnica |xHistoria
650 4|aPlata |xIndustrias |xAspectos Sociales|zZacatecas |xHistoria
651 0|aZacatecas |xRelaciones Étnicas|xHistoria
651 0|aMéxico|xHistoria|yColonia, 1540-1810